Suns Draft Profile: Kris Dunn

Mar 7, 2015; Providence, RI, USA; Providence Friars guard Kris Dunn (3) dribbles the ball as Butler Bulldogs forward Roosevelt Jones (21) defends during the first half at Dunkin Donuts Center. Mandatory Credit: Mark L. Baer-USA TODAY Sports

Mar 7, 2015; Providence, RI, USA; Providence Friars guard Kris Dunn (3) dribbles the ball as Butler Bulldogs forward Roosevelt Jones (21) defends during the first half at Dunkin Donuts Center. Mandatory Credit: Mark L. Baer-USA TODAY Sports

Kris Dunn
6’4” 205 lbs Point Guard
2015-16 Stats at Providence: 33 MPG, 16.4 PPG, 5.3 RPG, 6.2 APG, 2.5 SPG, 0.6 BPG

When you start to look at the top guard prospects in this year’s draft, Kris Dunn catches your eye immediately. The Junior from Providence is labeled by the experts as the draft’s top point guard, and for good reason. Dunn averaged 16.4 points in 33 minutes per game, while grabbing 5.3 rebounds, and dishing out 6.2 assists. At 22 years old, he is younger than other top guard Buddy Hield, while showing the potential on the defensive end that Hield lacks. With athleticism and speed that NBA teams look for, Dunn has been projected as high as number three in mock drafts.

Strengths:
Dunn has the body to be great in the NBA. Listed at 6′ 4″, He boasts a 6’9″ wingspan, with enough strength and weight to use his size to his advantage. He can guard players lined up at either guard positions, as well as the ability to take on some Small Forwards. His length allows him to jump passing lanes, helping him average 2.5 steals per game, and the potential to be a lockdown defender in the NBA.

On the offensive end, Dunn uses his size in the paint to score. He has a few post moves he can use against smaller guards, while also being able to cut to the basket on or off ball and finish. He was able to average 37.2% from the three point line this season, forcing defenders to honor his shot from behind the arc. Dunn also has home run playmaking potential, with the ability to make his own shot, or set up his teammates. He can throw accurate passes with just the right amount of touch to get his teammates easy baskets. Dunn’s ability to lead the fast break shows his passing ability, kicking it out to the three point line, or throwing a lob pass for the transition dunk.

Weaknesses:
Dunn’s biggest weakness might be his offensive game. He relies on his athleticism to score, but that athleticism doesn’t help his jump shot. At times his shot from behind the arc is ice cold, and Dunn’s mid range jumper is unreliable. When Dunn looks to pass, he will always go for the home run play. He averaged 3.5 turnovers per game, and definitely worries about his flashiness over doing things simple.

On the defensive side of the ball, Dunn lacks structure. While jumping lanes leads to steals, it also hurts his team’s defense when he misses. He will need a coach that holds him accountable, and help bring structure to his game.

How does he fit?
Dunn’s defense would help Booker in the backcourt, taking pressure off of one of the league’s worst perimeter defenders last season. Paired up alongside Bledsoe, the Suns sending out a lineup with those two, P.J. Tucker, and Tyson Chandler could turn into one of the stingier lineups in the league.

While Dunn doesn’t want to be picked up by the Suns or Celtics, he would easily be the long term answer at point guard. However, if he was drafted, that would mean one of our current guards would have to be traded. His skills are not as effective while on the bench, and even less so buried behind four or five other guards. His game will be even less effective with other guards who want the ball. Both Eric Bledsoe and Devin Booker are more combo guards, and their talents would be minimized playing mostly off ball.

davidmcgraw

Currently attending Arizona State University to finish a degree in Psychology. Ball don't lie.

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